Sunday, February 21, 2021

The Cancer at UC Irvine

 Gary Fouse

fousesquawk

http://garyfouse.blogspot.com


This article first appeared in Times of Israel Blogs.


Recently, we reported on the latest BDS (Boycott, Divest and Sanction) resolution that was passed by the student senate at UC Irvine, where I taught part-time 1998-2016. The resolution against Israel passed, and the university quickly issued a statement that they would not abide by it. The damage is that these resolutions, which go on all over the nation in our universities, only direct more negative attention to Jewish students and increase anti-Semitism. Jews are perceived as universally supporting the Jewish state of Israel, which in reality, is not true. Most American Jews support Israel, but some do not. Some even join forces with those who want to destroy the Jewish state. That is the true aim of BDS.

Richard Cravatts, former president of Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, has also taken note of the latest out of UCI and has written about it in Frontpage Magazine. I am cross-posting it below.

https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/2021/02/malignant-tradition-uc-irvines-hate-israel-richard-l-cravatts/

Sadly, UCI has acquired a reputation as a hotbed of anti-Israel and anti-Semitic agitation, largely due to the annual anti-Israel week of events every May. Over the last two decades, I have attended many of those events in order to document them, videotape them, and directly question the speakers. I can tell you, I have seen and heard a lot of vicious people speak at these events. 

As I have always said, 99% of the students at UCI are not involved in this ugliness, but those who are have all but destroyed the reputation of what should otherwise be considered a great university. I blame the administrators at UCI (and the entire UC system) for their weakness in allowing this problem to fester and grow.

In 2015-16, I was active with the Amcha Initiative and others in lobbying the UC Regents to draw up a suitable statement of principles against intolerance that specifically addressed anti-Semitism, as opposed to simply condemning all forms of hate. After all, it was anti-Semitism on campus that was the reason a revised statement of principles was under consideration. In 2016, the UC Regents finalized a statement that included such language. 

https://garyfouse.blogspot.com/2017/06/jewish-organizations-to-uci-chancellor.html

Unfortunately, it has proved to be nothing more than a scrap of paper that UCI can stick in the files of their Office of Inclusive Excellence and show the public that everything is just fine. But since that paper was finalized, UCI has continued to see anti-Zionist weeks every May (at least until the Covid crisis hit), and speakers like Hussam Ayloush (CEO of CAIR in S. California), Rabab Abdulhadi, (professor at San Francisco State University) and Zahra Billoo (CEO of CAIR in No. California) come to campus to spread their poison. Some progress.

Now we have another dangerous ingredient being added to the poisonous cocktail. Thanks to the latest academic creation-intersectionality- all ills of the world can be linked to Israel including the grievances of BLM. If George Floyd was killed by Minneapolis cops, it was partially Israel's fault because they trained that department and taught them the tactic of kneeling on a black suspect's neck-or something like that. And don't think the connection hasn't been made by those who ingest this propaganda. Last May, BLM rioters rampaged through the Fairfax district of Los Angeles, attacking synagogues and yelling curses at Jews from their car windows. It was a pogrom though nobody would admit it. One would think that after such an event, activists might realize that stoking hatred against Jews was a dangerous idea. Not the pro-Palestinian crowd, however. It's full steam ahead, and if they can convince American blacks that the Jewish state of Israel is their enemy too, so what if a few American Jews get beat up?

Shame on the pro-Palestinian movement for stirring up this kind of hate toward American Jews with their lies. And shame on our universities for allowing this treatment of its Jewish students. When I first got involved in this issue at UCI back around 2007, I learned that our university campuses were the focal point for the resurgence in anti-Semitism in the US. Rather than seeing it nipped in the bud, it has metastasized to society as a whole. The only positive aspect is that the issue of anti-Semitism can no longer be denied or swept under the rug. It is there for all to see. And UCI has played a role.

Tuesday, January 26, 2021

Sweden: Afghan Man Gets 10 Months and No Deportation for Sexually Abusing His Daughter

 Gary Fouse

fousesquawk

http://garyfouse.blogspot.com


Hat tip Fria Tider. Translation by Fousesquawk. 


Mora (Dalarna), Sweden

The insanity continues in Sweden. While the government continues to ignore the carnage and the rapes going on in the country, thanks to their insane immigration policies, the courts continue to treat offenders with light prison sentences and no deportations in spite of the severity of the crimes. 

In this latest report by Fria Tider, translated by Fousesquawk, we read of a 45-year-old Afghan man convicted of sexually abusing his teenage daughter on multiple occasions, beating her, and getting a sentence of 10 months with no deportation.

https://www.friatider.se/forgrep-sig-sexuellt-pa-sin-dotter-att-kontrollera-om-hon-var-muslim

Sexually abused his daughter to "check if she was Muslim"

-Posted January 25, 2021, 15:27


Caption below photo: Mora (Dalarna) Courthouse

Domestic- An Afghan man, aged 45, in Dalarna, has been sentenced to prison but avoids deportation for having sexually abused his daughter on a number of occasions. He blamed the abuse on his daughter and said that she should pray to Allah for forgiveness, according to the judgment.

The man came to Sweden in 2015 from Afghanistan with his daughter. The abuse against his daughter was committed while the daughter, according to the Swedish population register, was about 14 or younger, until May 2020.

On a number of occasions, he lay down beside his daughter in her bed, kissed her and caressed her breast as he masturbated or pressed his sex (organ) against her and made intercourse-like movements.

The girl testified in court that the father, after the first occasion, explained to her that what happened was her fault and they should pray together for Allah's forgiveness.

When they lived with a  Swedish couple, he would lay next to her in the mornings, (scratch himself) against her and "said that he was checking if she was a Muslim", according to the judgment.

According to the daughter's passport, issued in Afghanistan, she was born in 2005. There has since emerged information, which the girl received from her mother, that she was really born in 2007, and that she is, thus, 13 years old now.

The abuse was discovered in the spring of 2020 when the Afghan beat his daughter in front of their neighbors after she had lost a cell phone. The girl told the Swedish couple what she had been exposed to.

The father, who has several other children in Afghanistan, denied the crime and claimed that he "had only shown (his) love for his daughter when he lay next to her in bed. He also claimed that he "had problems with his penis" with an itchy rash and that it was "hard to control the itching."

The court of Mora has now sentenced the man to 10 months in prison for four counts of sexual abuse against a child and one count of  (physical) abuse. He is allowed to stay in Sweden though since the prosecutor had not urged that he be deported.



Sunday, January 10, 2021

The Academic Lynching of Law Professor John Eastman

 Gary Fouse

fousesquawk

http://garyfouse.blogspot.com


On Wednesday, prior to President Trump's speech to protesters in Washington, Rudy Giuliani spoke to the crowd. He then introduced Professor John Eastman a conservative Constitutional law professor at Chapman University in Orange, California. Eastman described how voting machines were allegedly rigged using algorithms to help Joe Biden get the needed number of votes to defeat President Trump. It should be noted that while both speakers passionately stated their belief that the election was stolen, neither encouraged violence, and neither made any mention of the marching to the Capitol. Yet, in addition to President Trump, both men are being accused of engaging in incitement. In addition, efforts are ongoing by some at Chapman University to have Eastman fired. A similar move is underway at Colorado University at Boulder, where Eastman is a visiting professor. The presidents of both universities have severely criticized Eastman's remarks but are refusing to fire him citing First Amendment protections.

The words of both Giuliani and Eastman can be seen here (hat tip Ugetube.com).

Last month, Eastman first came under fire for joining Trump's legal team in a court filing. He was accused of improperly using his work contact information at Chapman in the filing (hat tip Legal Insurrection). 

Now, in the wake of Wednesday's events, Chapman president Daniele Struppa is facing demands to fire Eastman. In two statements to the campus community, Struppa has condemned Eastman but refuses to fire him.

"This week, John Eastman, a member of the Chapman faculty, played a role in the tragic events in Washington, D.C., that jeopardized our democracy."

That is an inaccurate and very unfair characterization. Eastman had nothing whatsoever to do with the events that took place at a separate location, in this case, the Capitol. As previously stated, he neither encouraged violence nor a march to the Capitol, let alone the storming of the Capitol. He expressed his belief that the election was stolen and outlined his reasons. 

Here is Struppa's follow-up statement to the campus.

In addition, Phil DiStefano, President of the University of Colorado, Boulder, strongly condemned Eastman's speech even while conceding his first amendment rights and refusing to fire him.

While the presidents of Chapman and Colorado University are correct in defending Eastman's First Amendment rights and refusing to bend to the demands to fire him, their characterizations of Eastman's words and actions are unfair. As to the December issue when Eastman joined the Trump legal team, our recent history is rife with incidents when university professors have appeared on Capitol Hill to testify, and their university affiliations were prominently noted. Did we not know that Anita Hill was a professor at the University of Oklahoma when she leveled charges against Clarence Thomas in his Supreme Court confirmation hearings? Even Joe Biden should remember that. He presided over the hearings. What about when the Brett Kavanaugh hearings were taken over by the accusations of Christine Blasey Ford? And who was Christine Blasey Ford? A professor at Palo Alto University. That was hardly kept from the public as she testified. And how about that Stanford law professor Pamela Karlan, who came to Washington to testify at Trump's impeachment hearings that the President had, indeed, committed impeachable offenses (in her opinion). We all knew she was a Stanford law professor. It was right there on the TV screen. How many times has that prominent Harvard Law Professor, Lawrence Tribe, weighed in on controversial issues, often on Capitol Hill, with his Harvard affiliation prominently displayed? Perhaps we should leave Hill and Ford off the list because, after all, they were the alleged victims, but don't tell me that university professors who enter the political arena are supposed to hide their credentials and pose as shoe salesmen. If it's OK for Pamela Karlan, it's OK for John Eastman.

To sum up, what we have here is an attack on Eastman for taking the side of President Trump in the election controversy. In academia, that is considered an unpardonable sin. To link him to the violence at the Capitol is wrong. That, however, will not stop the campus Jacobins from continuing their attacks. It is a sad commentary on the state of our universities today.


Saturday, January 2, 2021

The Cornell Campaign Against Professor William Jacobson

 Gary Fouse

fousesquawk

http://garyfouse.blogspot.com


This article first appeared in New English Review.


Cornell University Law School Professor William Jacobson, who runs a conservative blog called Legal Insurrection, has been going through Hell the past year or so due to his conservative views and recent criticism of Black Lives Matter. Students, faculty and administration have been loudly protesting Jacobson's views and trying to end his academic career at Cornell. He has recently been interviewed regarding his experiences. I have previously written in Jacobson's defense as well as that of other professors in other universities who are having similar difficulties for exercising their free speech rights.

This has caused me to reflect on my own experiences while teaching English as a second language (ESL) part-time at the University of California at Irvine (UCI) Extension from 1998-2016 while running my own conservative blog, Fousesquawk.

I should begin by emphasizing that it was my practice never to opine about political or other controversial issues in the classroom. I considered that it was my job to teach students to improve their English skills, not what to think about the world. However, beginning around 2006-2007, I did become active on other parts of the campus when I became aware of anti-Semitic and/or anti-American events taking place on campus. I am speaking primarily of the annual week of bashing Israel that comes every May to UCI courtesy of the Muslim Student Union and Students for Justice in Palestine. It was around that time that I started my blog in order to publicize these issues on campus. Thus, I began attending these events, listening, videotaping (over the objections of the speakers and those hosting the event-it was my legal right to do so), never disrupting, but asking pointed questions during the q and a.

It became my position-and still is- that the University of California system, as well as universities across the nation, are tolerating (anti-Semitic) intolerance in the very name of tolerance. They are simply afraid to confront the main purveyors of anti-Semitism on campus (pro-Palestinian forces) because they are predominantly Muslim. I thus became an open critic of the UCI administration as well as the chancellors of other campuses and the various presidents of the UC system.

Interestingly, and quite in contrast to the experiences of Professor Jacobson and many others, I never suffered any blowback from the University itself nor the UCI Extension, for whom I worked. In contrast to most humanities departments, the teacher corps in ESL was largely made up of people with foreign living experience, people who were bi-lingual, and often married to foreign spouses-as well as having a variety of political views. The common practice in our office was not to discuss politics (I did violate that occasionally), but the point is that my co-workers and supervisors knew my views, but we all got along very well. The University administration knew very well who I was because I wrote them several letters when I thought they were allowing anti-Semitism to rear its ugly head on campus. Yet, they never tried to silence me or threaten my job. Keep in mind that as a part-timer, I worked on a  quarterly contract. I had no tenure, no employment rights. They didn't need to fire me. All they had to do was not give me a class to teach the next quarter, and I would have been gone. Of course, being a  retired government employee with a pension and health benefits, it would not have caused me any great stress.

The point I am making here is that the University of California and UC Irvine respected my right of free speech. When I needed to communicate with university administrators, I did so in a professional and polite manner. There was no personal acrimony. I did have a couple of unpleasant exchanges with two UCI professors, with whom I was on opposite sides of the fence, as well as professors from other campuses and speakers who came to speak at UCI. But that's what you sign up for when you choose to become an activist and speak out at so many of these ugly events that take place on campuses.

In the end, my age and declining energy told me it was time to pack it in with my teaching career. I also wanted to leave on my own terms and not as a result of some unfortunate occurrence on campus related to my activism. In the end, I chose to stop teaching, but I remained on great terms with those with whom and for whom I worked in the UCI Extension. UCI is in many respects, a great university, but it has similar problems as other great universities. At the risk of digressing, one of the saving graces of UCI is that it has a relatively small Humanities department. It's law school, on the other hand, is little more than a training ground for liberal activists.

It is unfortunate that other teachers like Professor Jacobson have not been as lucky as I was. It is a disgrace that his own colleagues have turned against him simply because they don't share his views. This is not what a university is supposed to be. Cornell is a prestigious university, part of the Ivy League. Yet, that school suffers from several problems, not just the Jacobson issue. Anti-Semitism is one of those issues at Cornell. When you look at other Ivy League institutions like Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, etc., you see the same problems.

It is a great experience working on a university campus, but there are many problems in the academic culture. It is a culture dominated by extreme leftist thinkers, people who all too often, do not respect the free speech rights of others. It is a culture that needs to change, but it is going to take a long time to change the culture that has been building up since the 1960s when I was in college. It will take a long time to change the leftist domination in academia, but at least universities could follow the example of UC Irvine and not try to hound teachers who don't follow the herd.


Monday, December 14, 2020

Don't You Dare Disrespect Dr. Biden

 Gary Fouse

fousesquawk

http://garyfouse.blogspot.com


Call me uninformed, but for years when I heard Jill Biden referred to as "Dr Jill Biden", I thought she was a practicing physician. It wasn't until the Democratic convention that I learned that she was actually a former teacher with a PhD. Truth be told, there has been lots of misleading information surrounding the Biden family, but I will stay with this specific topic.

It seems that the Jacobins at Northwestern University are all upset that a former NW English teacher has written an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal advising Jill to drop the Dr title because it is misleading. 

https://www.foxnews.com/media/wsj-op-ed-on-dr-jill-biden-gets-writer-canceled-by-northwestern-university

Here is what the Daily Northwestern has to say about all this:

https://dailynorthwestern.com/2020/12/12/lateststories/nu-condemns-former-english-lecturer-joseph-epsteins-op-ed-calling-jill-biden-to-drop-doctor-title/

“Northwestern is firmly committed to equity, diversity and inclusion, and strongly disagrees with Mr. Epstein’s misogynistic views,” the University wrote.

Is there a university in the Land that doesn't use this by-line? But I digress.

Personally, calling someone with a PhD "Dr" is appropriate in a university setting or when that person is being addressed in their capacity as an academic. To use it as an everyday title the way Jill Biden has been using it does strike me as a bit presumptuous.  

And unlike Whoopi Goldberg, I never presumed that Jill Biden was an "amazing" doctor who should be surgeon general.



Friday, December 4, 2020

Rashida Tlaib, Anti-Semitism, and "From the River to the Sea"

 Gary Fouse

fousesquawk

http://garyfouse.blogspot.com


Hat tip JNS and Times of Israel


"From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free"


As is always the case with controversial people, Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) has been in the news a lot lately. No, she didn't call President Trump a "motherf-----" (at least, not that I know of). Tlaib raised eyebrows just days ago when it was revealed that she was slated to appear December 15 on a virtual panel with three other controversial individuals-Israel haters all- to discuss the topic of anti-Semitism.

Julius Streicher and Hitler were unavailable. 


"From the Oder to the Rhine, Germany will be Judenrein"


https://www.jns.org/tlaib-and-others-peddling-anti-jewish-rhetoric-to-speak-on-panel-about-anti-semitism/

Of course, people like Tlaib and her ilk have their own slant on what anti-Semitism is all about. Tlaib, of course, denies that she is anti-Jewish; after all, being of Palestinian stock, how could she possibly be?

If Tlaib's inclusion on such a panel on anti-Semitism wasn't ironic enough, she managed to underline the hypocrisy when she re-tweeted a cute little jingle on the occasion of Palestinian-Something Day (November 29). The jingle goes like this:

"From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free".

https://www.timesofisrael.com/democrat-tlaib-shares-tweet-alluding-to-israels-elimination/

If you haven't been on a college campus lately, the meaning is simple: From the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea, Palestine will be free. Those are the borders of Israel. It means that there will be no more Israel and no more Jews. Only a state called Palestine made up of and run by Palestinians. Oh, people like Tlaib might tell you that such a state could also include Jews in a multi-ethnic society, but we all know that if they were not driven out or slaughtered, they would be forced to live as minority dhimmis under the thumb of the Palestinians. Tlaib knows exactly what it means.

In November, the voters of her district in Michigan, which includes parts of Detroit and Dearborn, had the chance to correct their mistake of 2018 and vote Tlaib out on her can. That they chose to re-elect her says tons about this district.



Saturday, November 21, 2020

2019 FBI Hate Crime Report

 Gary Fouse

fousesquawk

http://garyfouse.blogspot.com



This article first appeared in Times of Israel Blogs.


The FBI has released its annual report for hate crimes in 2019. What is significant is that Jews seemed to be the biggest target of religious hate crimes. There was not only a 14% increase in attacks against Jews but, as victims, they accounted for 60% of the total religious hate crimes. The numbers may shock some, but they didn’t shock me. I have been watching this problem fester for almost 15 years now.


 I first began paying attention around 2006 when I was teaching part-time at the University of California at Irvine and saw how the pro-Palestinian, anti-Israel activism on our campus was often spilling over into unabashed Jew-hatred. The purveyors of this modern-day anti-Semitism tried to disguise it in the form of “anti-Zionism”. They denied they were anti-Semitic. Many of the anti-Israel professors and speakers invited to campus by Students for Justice in Palestine and the Muslim Student Union were themselves Jewish. That could not change the fact that vicious anti-Semites like Oakland-based imam, Amir Abdel Malik Ali, and Washington DC-based imams, Mohamed al-Asi and Abdul Alim Musa also came to our campus and engaged in heated anti-Jewish rhetoric. I know. I was present on several such occasions. 

 It was just this specific situation at UC Irvine that made me an activist though I myself am not Jewish. As a student of the history of the Third Reich, I was already sensitive to the issue of anti-Semitism. As I watched the deteriorating situation for Jews in Europe, I realized that anti-Semitism was enjoying a resurgence in the US as well. The focal point for that resurgence was on our university campuses, and the entire University of California system was a particular hotspot, though it must be pointed out that the problem exists in universities all over the US and Canada. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the latest example of campus under the microscope as a result of numerous complaints from Jewish students. And the spark that lights the fire on campuses across the country is the Israel-Palestinian conflict. It is one of the biggest hot-button issues on countless university campuses.

 From the campuses, the problem has now metastasized across society. This is purely anecdotal and personal, and I don’t have the empirical evidence for this, but when I first got involved back in 2006-7, my impression was that it was a campus problem. The local Jewish community did not seem to be overly aware of what was happening on campus in the peaceful bedroom community of Irvine. Indeed, we struggled to bring the problem to the attention of the local community. In that effort, we and Jewish students who wanted to speak out and fight back were thwarted in our efforts by national Jewish organizations like the Jewish Federation (Orange County) and Hillel, both of whom were too embedded and invested in the university to want to make waves. Meanwhile, the ADL was simply missing in action. They prefer to this day to concentrate on anti-Semitism coming from white nationalists.

 Not to defend white anti-Semites; they are to be condemned as well. I just don’t believe they account for the major part of the problem. Then again, I don’t have the empirical evidence at my fingertips. I hope that the FBI report gets wide dissemination. The public must demand action from the government. Not to get political, but under the Trump administration, the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights has taken an active role in addressing this issue. If Joe Biden becomes our next president, as it appears he will, I hope that policy will continue. I fear, however, that the Biden administration is going to be more Palestinian-friendly. That will have repercussions not only with our Israel policy but on our campuses as well. Jew-hatred has always been an issue that cuts across ethnic lines. 

Next year’s FBI report will surely include the May 2020 pogrom that occurred in the Fairfax district of Los Angeles, largely carried out by Black Lives Matter thugs in the wake of the George Floyd death. The truth is that we all need to examine anti-Semitism within our own communities and within our own ethnic groups, white, black, Muslim, etc. Here in the US, our universities also need to address this issue. After all, at least in my opinion, this is where it began to explode.